Fitzroy’s Storm Glass

What is a Storm Glass?
A Storm Glass is a type of Barometer or historical weather forecasting device that came into general use in the early 1700s.


Who used the Storm Glass?
Sailors attached this instrument to the mast of their ships in order to forecast good or foreboding conditions at sea. “Fitzroy’s” Storm Glass derives its name from Admiral Robert Fitzroy (1805-1865), who was the commander of the HMS Beagle. Fitzroy was a participant in Charles Darwin’s expedition (1834-1836) and carefully studied the Storm Glass, refining the chemical formulation and established clear observational guidelines as follows.


How to read the Storm Glass:



  • Clear liquid – bright and clear weather

  • Cloudy liquid, sometimes with small stars and crystals at the top – cloudy weather with the possibility of thunderstorms and rain. 

  • Small dots in the liquid – humid or foggy weather

  • Large flaky crystals – cloudy skies, snow in winter

  • Threads of crystals at the top – windy weather

  • Crystals at the bottom – frost may be coming


How does it work?
How the Storm Glass works is still a bit of a mystery, but it is thought that electromagnetic changes in weather patterns activate the crystals inside (sealed-glass chamber fills with crystals when air pressure decreases). The liquid within the glass is a mixture of several ingredients, including: distilled water, ethanol, potassium nitrate, ammonium chloride, and camphor.

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Details

Details

What is a Storm Glass?
A Storm Glass is a type of Barometer or historical weather forecasting device that came into general use in the early 1700s.

Who used the Storm Glass?
Sailors attached this instrument to the mast of their ships in order to forecast good or foreboding conditions at sea. “Fitzroy’s” Storm Glass derives its name from Admiral Robert Fitzroy (1805-1865), who was the commander of the HMS Beagle. Fitzroy was a participant in Charles Darwin’s expedition (1834-1836) and carefully studied the Storm Glass, refining the chemical formulation and established clear observational guidelines as follows.

How to read the Storm Glass:

  • Clear liquid – bright and clear weather
  • Cloudy liquid, sometimes with small stars and crystals at the top – cloudy weather with the possibility of thunderstorms and rain. 
  • Small dots in the liquid – humid or foggy weather
  • Large flaky crystals – cloudy skies, snow in winter
  • Threads of crystals at the top – windy weather
  • Crystals at the bottom – frost may be coming

How does it work?
How the Storm Glass works is still a bit of a mystery, but it is thought that electromagnetic changes in weather patterns activate the crystals inside (sealed-glass chamber fills with crystals when air pressure decreases). The liquid within the glass is a mixture of several ingredients, including: distilled water, ethanol, potassium nitrate, ammonium chloride, and camphor.

Tips:

  • When you receive your Storm Glass, it will be in a state of disruption and may take a week or so to settle into its active state. The glass should start as a clear liquid to ‘reset’ the barometer. If it isn’t clear, gently shake the tube to redistribute the crystals into soluble liquid. 
  • You can also use a hair dryer to dissolve any remaining crystals, but do not heat the glass until it becomes hot!
  • The optimal temperature range for crystal formation is 5C-30C. The crystals will dissolve and the liquid will appear clear above or below these temperatures. 
  • Place Storm Glass in an area of you home that is not subject to sudden temperature changes. Avoid placing it near heating or cooling vents or by a window that gets direct sun. 
  • For optimal performance, the barometer will need to be ‘reset’ a couple of times a year by gently shaking the glass to redistribute the crystals. 

History:
Later in life, Fitzroy was appointed chief of the newly formed British meteorological office. When violent storms struck the UK 1859, the British Crown distributed storm glasses (which were known as “Fitzroy’s storm barometers”) to many small fishing communities around the British Isles.

Dimensions: 28cm high x 5.5cm diameter of base x 3.5cm diameter of body of tube.

A great gift for someone fascinated by the weather, or a 15th Wedding Anniversary gift (crystal).

Additional Info

Additional Info

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Reviews

Customer Reviews (3)

Excellent seller, very happy with purchase, fantastic to deal withReview by Lee
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Excellent seller, very happy with purchase, fantastic to deal with (Posted on 12/2/2017)
Perfect! Fast delivery! Thanks heapsReview by allmorri4
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Perfect! Fast delivery! Thanks heaps (Posted on 11/28/2017)
Wonderful experience!! Will definitely use this store again 10/10 :DReview by rhymenoceros25
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Wonderful experience!! Will definitely use this store again 10/10 :D (Posted on 11/28/2017)

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